Becoming a Friend of God

I’m preaching at Simpson-Hamline United Methodist Church this Sunday while the Pastor is on vacation.  Bill preached last Sunday, and he started his sermon by singing “My Tribute” in his wonderfully deep and resonate baritone, then went on to give a powerful testimony about God’s saving grace.  So he set the bar pretty high for me to follow up this week!

The text I’ve chosen, John 15: 12-17, is a part of Jesus’ farewell discussion with his disciples.  I’m focusing on verse 14-15, where Jesus calls his disciples friends.  He no

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longer calls them (us) servants, he now calls us his friends. I’ve been fascinated by my deep study of this text.  One of the things that happens when you delve deeply into a text to understand it more fully — I call it “deep sea diving”– you come up with many treasures, usually more than you can recount effectively in one sermon (although many preachers are too inclined to try). So don’t worry, if you come to Simpson-Hamline this Sunday (service begins at 10 am)  this blog isn’t usurping my sermon. The reason I’m sharing this with you now is that I really haven’t been able to focus on anything else that I want to share here, so I decided to stop trying and just let you know what’s on my mind.

The other thing I’ve been doing this week is reading comments from a LinkedIn group, “Interfaith Professionals,” where comments  are being posted by persons from different faiths on the question “Why does God let people suffer?”  The responses are interesting, as you might expect.  People wrestle with this question a lot, and it has caused many to challenge the goodness and/or the reality of God.

All of this brings me to the question for today:  If Jesus — God — is really our friend, why do we still have to suffer?  Since we understand that God is all powerful and can do anything, then why would God-our-friend ever allow pain and difficulties into our lives? Why doesn’t God just step in and stop whatever it is–all the time?  Why wouldn’t God save the lives of many good and God-believing people from the horrible typhoon that is hitting the Philippines right now? Wouldn’t God stop a Christian woman from being raped or tortured? Wouldn’t our friend Jesus always carry us through the storm, away from harm, as the above picture depicts?

Many of us know from personal experience and testimonies from others that God does intervene, God does save and God still works miracles in this world.  But that does not mean that we won’t ever have to suffer, because we will. And we have no way of knowing when or why God will save some and not others or when the storms will come into our lives and we will find ourselves suffering.

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What kind of friend is someone who has the power to save us from pain and sorrow and doesn’t do it?

I believe the best kind of friend.  Not because God wants to us to suffer–I believe that God cries right along with us–but because God wants us to be better people than we would be without suffering. We could never understand what it means to have love and compassion if we weren’t required, from time to time, to open our hearts to others who are living in or going through difficulties.  We’d never know how important it is to have friends unless we had a need to lean on someone else every once in awhile–and that includes our friend God!

Humanity grows intellectually, deepens spiritually and gains wisdom from searching for the causes of suffering and figuring out how to relieve them.  So that’s the job that we’re given by the challenge of human suffering–to wrestle with the things that cause suffering and fix them.  That’s what people are called to do, and it involves everything from helping people to experience the God of love to researching the causes of diseases, from offering a meal to a homeless person to enacting legislation to create affordable housing and living wages, from being a friend to an at-risk child to working to overcome poverty and to dismantle for-profit prison systems. The added benefit is that these are the kind of works that make life truly meaningful for us.

That’s the call of God on all of us, all of humanity, to use all that we are to help each other– hearts that care, minds that study, hands that help, strength that endures and souls that understand the importance of rejoicing through it all. When we do these things, we’re helping to accomplish God’s purposes in this world, and that’s when we become friends of God.  You see, friendship is a two-way street. You can’t really have a friend unless you are a friend.  Sooo….you want Jesus to be your friend???

Faith’s X-Ray Vision

Wouldn’t you like to have x-ray vision like Superman?  I mean, you could see through things to find stuff that you lost, and you could avoid people you didn’t want to see without opening your door.  Of course, you would need to be like Superman and not use your super power for any kind of nefarious purpose.  Yeah, right.  Maybe that’s why God didn’t give us that capability.  On the other hand, if we all had x-ray vision, it wouldn’t be such a big deal, would it?

As powerful as Superman’s x-ray vision is, it is not as powerful as God’s vision.  Superman can see through things–God sees into the heart.  When the prophet Samuel was assigned to choose among Jesse’s sons who would be the next King of Israel, Samuel assumed the choice would be Eliab, the handsomest, eldest, and the tallest of the boys.  He would not have chosen David, the youngest and smallest, if God had not whispered in his ear:  “I don’t see mortals the way you see them–I look at their hearts and not on their outward appearance.” (See 1 Samuel 16:1-13)

God’s ability to see into our hearts is even more compelling than Dr. King’s admonition that we are to measure people not by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.  God sees even beyond the character we show to the world.  God sees through to our hearts, with the authority that only God holds, as the one who knows us completely, and who knows who we were intended to be.

And God wants those of us who believe to see the world through God’s eyes.  God calls us to be ambassadors for Christ in the world, and that means we need to see things as God sees them so we can properly represent God in the world. (See 2 Corinthians 5: 16-21)  Whew!  That’s a pretty tall order.  If our job is to try to see the world around us as God sees it, we have to learn how to see beyond the physical appearance of things. We need to see into the hearts of people and into the hearts of the situations that we face. We have to understand God, somewhat, in order to do that, don’t you think?  And it takes faith. That’s what we are to use, a kind of x-ray vision that comes through faith in God.

When we look at others through faith’s x-ray vision, we don’t see color, race, nationalities, cultures…all those divisions that the world creates among God’s people.  We instead see the beloved children of God, a beautiful rainbow of diversity designed according to God’s amazing creativity. When we look through faith’s x-ray vision, we no longer see different religions, just children who’re struggling in their own different ways and cultures to understand God.

When we understand that all of this earth is the Lord’s, and everything in it, we  no longer see people coming from Mexico as illegal aliens or people trying to take away our jobs.  We instead see a people who are trying to make a living for themselves, and we see that there is plenty of land between these two countries with more than enough resources for all of us.  As Ambassadors for Christ, we understand that there is  a better way to allocate the resources so that all can do well– and we understand that we need to help others see that.

Through faith, we no longer see children who are brutal gang members and who learn evil as fodder for our prison systems, but we see them instead as children who have themselves been brutalized by poverty and strife and abuse, with no one to help them through it.  As Ambassadors for Christ, we understand that there is a way to reach them with the love of God, and we know that if we work at reconciling them to their true natures, we can save them.

Through faith, instead of seeing people with different political agendas as enemies or opponents against whom we must fight because they don’t want the same things we want, we see a people who have different views, some of which may be legitimate.  As Ambassadors for Christ, we take the first step to reconcile, to mend fences and begin real conversations to work for what is best for all.

Through faith, instead of seeing people who are poor as people who don’t know how to take care of themselves, people who are dependent on others and who drain our resources, we see poverty as the problem to address, and not the people.  We see a broken system that protects the haves who want to hang onto what they have and who think they need more than they do. As Ambassadors for Christ,  we know it is our job to help the world understand how to better share the abundantly plentiful natural resources that God has given to all of us.

With faith’s x-ray vision, maybe we can become more like Superman! Or better yet, more like God.

 

 

 

 

Where We Come In

It seems to me that reports about horrible atrocities committed by humans against humans in our country have been peculiarly abundant over the past few months.  Now don’t get me wrong, I don’t mean the U.S. is not a great place to live compared to many other countries, especially those places where brutal war and corruption are commonplace.  One of the good things to know is that atrocities still make the news here, which means they are not common. So in a round about way these reports help us know that we are pretty well off.

The three recent big ones–the horrible shooting of 20 children and 6 adults in Newtown Connecticut in December, the bombings at the Boston Marathon in April killing 6 people and injuring 264, and the discovery of three young girls held in brutal captivity for over 10 years–are enough to make anyone with a heart shudder and cry. Add to that the numerous other smaller crimes, such as the police officer who was brutally shot down when he walked up to a car that he had pulled over, and the 5 year old who accidentally shot his two year old sister with a “kiddie” gun given to him by his parents. I’m not sure which I consider the most egregious, making a “kiddie” gun or loading it and giving it to a 5 year old …. both are horrific to me.

Doesn’t all this just make you just want to holler! While hollering does help relieve our frustration and anger, it doesn’t do much to help the situation.

One of the things that really touched me was when one of the teachers in Newtown told the children that they had to hide because there was a bad guy out there and they had to wait until the good guys came. She knew the good guys were coming, it was just a matter of time.  She knew that whoever was shooting would not be allowed to continue it without someone stepping up to stop the madness.

That’s the good thing about our country–we will not let the madness continue. And the good guys will come.  Like those policemen who rescued so many of the children in Newtown, like those folks in the Boston bombings who ran to help the injured instead of running away to save themselves, and like Charles Ramsey, who responded to calls of help and broke through the door, ending a decade of abuse for three young women.  The good guys will come.

Most of us who are followers of Christ, no matter what form that following may take, consider ourselves to be the good guys. (I’d like to say all of us, but I can’t be sure of that!)  It doesn’t matter whether we’re Roman Catholics or Non-denominational, whether we’re Episcopal or Pentecostals, whether we’re Baptist or simply believers who are “spiritual but not religious.”  We all consider ourselves to be the good guys.  And if we are, we must wrestle with where we are to come in.  What do we do as the “good guys” to make ourselves known? When do we don our “white hats” (a metaphor I don’t like, but it makes the point), and take actions to deal with such troubling situations?

I know some of us will always help out with a hand out, some will serve as mentors and helpers and others will be kind to anyone who is in trouble. But is this kind of help enough?  When we find ourselves faced with atrocities like the ones we’re seeing too much of lately, we need to ask the harder, deeper questions to determine what in our society might be contributing to the situation.  We need to address the structural causes, such as the need for more research and funding to support mental health; dealing honestly and intentionally with the negative image of our nation and our nation’s predominant faith, Christianity, that is held in the minds of so many people in other countries, especially “third world” nations; and deciding whether our country’s founders intended to protect the “right” of people to keep and carry the kind of  semi-automatic weapons that cause such mass destruction. These are the bigger issues, the foundational issues we need to address if we are to make this country even better than it already is.

Our job as Christians is to try to see the world around us through God’s eyes.  When we do, we will always look for the underlying causes of evil in this world, we will always seek more justice and righteousness and we will always be led by love and grace. And we will  act–we will come in–to deal with the situation.  If we really are the good guys….

 

 

 

Where Deep Calls to Deep

I just finished reading Maya Angelou’s beautiful and thought-provoking poem “A Brave and Startling Truth.”  It touched me deeply. She read it on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the founding of the United Nations in San Francisco, June 26, 1995,  I am sad to say that I had not read it before…. I found it the other day quite by accident.  I was researching a bit on a concept for a sermon, and searched  the phrase “where we come in,” just to see if there were others who had used this as a title in anything– something I do sometimes just to find out what’s out there.  This phrase is not in her poem at all, but it is closely enough related to the phrase repeated in her poem, “when we come to it,” that Google picked it up.

Her poem took me somewhere deep, a place to which I love to go but don’t seem to get to often enough.  It’s the place I seek when I turn my thoughts to sermon writing; a place that if I haven’t got there, I don’t feel prepared to speak.  It’s the place I hope to help others find when I speak and write.

I remember the first time I found that place, deep within, long before I ever felt the call to ministry. I wrote a couple of notes to myself then because I wanted to remember how I felt. I’ve kept these notes for more than 35 years:

I feel like beautiful feelings

Like writing love music

Conducting a symphony orchestra

Painting a sunset

Singing a sweet sad song

Like crying

Like hugging

Like loving

Like caressing a loved ones’ cheek with mine

Like sharing a warm feeling

Like smiling from deep within.

When it comes it makes me want to

Make earrings out of something

Make poetry out of thoughts

Put some of me down on paper.

 I’m sharing this with you now (although I have second thoughts about the “make earrings” part!)  because this place, deep within, is the place where I believe our inward spirituality connects to God.  Psalm 42:7 describes the feeling:  “Deep calls to deep in the roar of your waterfalls; all your waves and breakers have swept over me.” Howard Thurman, the great spiritual leader and former Dean of Howard University’s Rankin Chapel, described a moment in his ordination when he felt “the heavens opened and the spirit descended like a dove.” Then he wrote:  “Ever since, when it seems that I am deserted by the voice that called me forth, I know that if I can find my way back to that moment, the clouds will lift and the path before me will once again be clear and beckoning.”  With Head and Heart, p. 58.

We all need to find that deep place within where God’s creative love breaks in on us and refreshes our souls. To me, when I’m not there, I’m just skimming on the surface of life, distracted by the many things around me that always seem to need my attention. We need to escape periodically from our everyday-life-management stuff so that we can tend to our spiritual lives, our inner beings, the deep place in which we find our true selves and hear God’s desires.

Getting there requires space for quiet and peace, personal time not distracted by other needs.  Getting there requires prayer and personal meditation. Some may need direction from spiritual leaders or teachers. Some can get there with a favorite bible verse or song. We all need to get there, whatever it may take, because that is where our direction can be found– not in the things of this world, but in the secret places of our hearts, where deep calls to deep. In that place we are refurbished. That’s where we share the joy of love with the One who created us out of love and for love, and we receive direction on how we are to share that love in the time that has been given to us.

Maya Angelou’s beautiful poem struck me so deeply because she lifts up the great paradox of humanity–our ability to evoke such great harm and so many awful disasters in this world, yet at the same time our ability to share such great, selfless and healing love. In this age of information when we are bombarded by the news of atrocities like those three young girls who were kidnapped and held in brutal captivity for a decade, the lethal bombing in Boston or the children being mowed down in Newtown Connecticut, we need to be reminded that there is also great love being shared.   We need to be reminded of the power of people like Mother Teresa, Hellen Keller, Mahatma Ghandi, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther KIng, Jr.,  and the millions of heroes and sheroes who constantly pour out God’s love for others through their kind actions.

When we come to that “brave and startling” truth that we have the power to fashion this world to be a better place, my prayer is that we will choose love as our creative blueprint. The kind of love that we need in order to fashion the world into a place where God’s kingdom will be seen here, as it is in heaven, is found in that place in our souls where “deep calls to deep.” If you’ve ever been there, you will feel the need to go back. If you’ve never been there, you should work on finding the way.

Would God Call a Woman to be a Pastor?

Sign on now if you support women in ministry.

This week I’m taking a break from one important issue to address another.  I’ve just returned from a meeting of the American Baptist Women in Ministry Advisory Team–a small, highly talented and inspired national denominational group with a passion for supporting women in ministry. If you’ve read my “writings” page (see link above), you know that gender discrimination in our churches is an important justice issue for me. The mission of American Baptist Churches Women in Ministry (ABWIM) is to educate on behalf of women in ministry, advocate for full recognition of women in ministerial leadership, cultivate and nurture women who are called to ministry and celebrate women’s gifts for ministry.  Check out the ABWIM website for more great information about our organization and our work.

Some American Baptist churches have been supporting women’s ordination and full recognition for women’s leadership in our churches for many years. Others, not so much.  While ABC-USA has been supportive of women for many years, I am sad to report that women comprise only about 10% of the pastors in ABC local churches.

Baptist tradition historically gives high importance to individual religious liberty and freedom (local autonomy) of the local churches.  Many people don’t understand that because the most vocal of the baptist groups in the United States, the Southern Baptists, exercise more control over member’s beliefs and churches than is consistent with baptist tradition.  If you’d like to learn more about American Baptists, the ABC-USA website has a good short history. So, as baptists, we who celebrate the freedom of individual belief must deal with the intolerance of women’s gifts in our churches not by command or coercion, but by education and compelling persuasion.

It is also sad that the basis for this discrimination against women is generated by how the bible is interpreted.  I love the bible.  It is my source of strength, renewal, faith, and hope.  Without the biblical witness sharing who our God is and what God calls us to do, I don’t know how I would have come to love God so much.  It hurts my heart to see so many being misled by a human interpretation of the biblical word that is inconsistent, in my viewpoint, to the great love that God and Jesus share with women.

Having grown up in a church that did not discriminate against women (African Methodist Episcopal), when I felt God’s call to ministry, I had no clue that any person would try to tell me that my call was not true. Before I was called, I had joined a baptist church that thankfully was supportive of women’s calls.  So it took me a while to realize how deep was the prejudice against women, especially in the African American baptist churches.  Because that prejudice is biblically based, I had to dig deep into my understanding of the bible to be able to respond to it.  You’ll see some of that research in the article referred to on my “writings” page.  The ABWIM website offers more information on biblical support for women’s leadership in our churches.

So, because you’re reading my blog I’m hoping that you support women in ministry.  If you do, then what our team wants you to do is to sign on.  We’ve created a letter of support on which we hope to get 10,000 signatures in support of women’s ministry.  We’re doing this to encourage those who are unsure to seek further information.  All you have to do is to click on this link, sign on, and tell somebody else to do the same.

“In the last days it will be, God declares, that I will pour out my Spirit upon all flesh,and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy…”  Acts 2: 17.

Is Poverty Inevitable?

I’m a Star Trek fan. Yes, I admit it. I wouldn’t actually call myself a “Trekkie,” wouldn’t dare dress like Lieutenant Uhura or attend a Star Trek convention. But I’m a fan. I love to watch the tv series and movie reruns. My all-time favorite Star Trek quote is made by an alien, beautifully made of pure crystal. When the crew is finally able to decipher what the angry crystal being is saying, it calls the humans: “You ugly bags of mostly water.” I can see how a crystal alien would see us like that.

I like shows that help us to imagine the future. To do that you have to pay attention to what’s happening now and imagine how the now might become better, or worse. Many of the futuristic technical ideas on shows like Star Trek have become reality, like laser technology. Maybe one day we’ll say “Beam me up, Scottie” and get transported!

The reason I’m going on about Star Trek is that in the future envisioned by the writers of the show, there is no longer any poverty. There also isn’t any more war or any use for money, either. But the idea that at some point we could actually become such a progressive society that we could eliminate poverty is quite intriguing to me. Poverty seems to be so ingrained in the fabric of our society that most people don’t think about a future without it. Poverty just seems to be an inevitable fact of life.

Having come of age during the 60’s, I remember well as a young black girl how racism felt inevitable. In our suburb outside of Chicago, the African American children all were assigned to one school and we all lived within a few designated blocks. When a few of the families moved out of our area and had to attend “white” schools, we cried. I was called the “n” word more than a few times by people who didn’t like my skin color. I went to a summer camp and the white girls wouldn’t do activities with me. The “black” night at the skating rink was on Mondays. And so on…

Racial hatred was just a part of the way things were, and we learned to deal with it. It never occurred to me that things could change until segregation was challenged by Dr. King, the civil rights movement, and all those brave souls who stood up against the injustice of it all. I imagine that slavery must have felt inevitable like that, too, until brave souls saw it as an abomination and stood up against the injustice of it all.

We’re not all born with equal capabilities, but we are all born as beautiful children, all loved equally by God. For us as a people to believe that we should try to eliminate poverty, we have to embrace the idea that all people are beautiful children of God, all worthy of our true love. We have to believe that every child born has a right to live safely, to adequate medical care, and to an education that will nurture their gifts. We have to believe that gaining more and more material wealth for ourselves while others go hungry or don’t have a place to live is an abomination, as abhorrent and backwards as racial hatred and slavery.  We have to believe that poverty is a tragic waste of human resources and gifts that hold the potential to benefit us all.

To eliminate poverty we’ll need some brave souls to take the kind of radical actions that will make others pay attention and stand against the injustice of it all. Radical actions, kind of like Jesus taught us when he told us to turn the other cheek, go the extra mile and give to others whenever they ask. Would Jesus accept poverty as inevitable? Some people think so, because He said to the disciples “You will always have the poor with you.” That’s the topic of next week’s blog.

A Stellar Model for Action

When my husband Bill and I were based in Chicago, we became involved with the Community Renewal Society, a faith-based organization that focuses on race and poverty issues.  CRS is a stellar model of churches organizing for social action.

Here’s how their website, www.communityrenewalsociety.org, describes what  they do: “Community Renewal Society works to empower individuals, community-based organizations and congregations to advocate for social and economic justice. Through its pioneering efforts, Community Renewal Society moves civic and religious leaders to take action on issues of racism and poverty.”

CRS publishes two newsmagazines that help to research and identify issues of concern, providing fodder for community action.  Catalyst Chicago focuses on public education, and The Chicago Reporter focuses on race and poverty issues. The CRS Civic Action Network provides advocacy training and organizes individuals from an ecumenical group of over 50 churches to take action.

Bill worked with a group that sought equality in nursing home care for homes located in the poor and primarily African American south side of Chicago. The Chicago Reporter found that nursing homes owned by one company provided higher quality services for the homes it ran in predominantly white neighborhoods than for those it ran in predominantly black neighborhoods. With publicity, that campaign was successful.

Both Bill and I worked with a group that challenged the Illinois General Assembly to provide adequate funding for the public school system.  At that time, Illinois was the 4th richest state in the United States, but it ranked next to last among the states in the amount of state funding provided for public schools.  Public school financing in Illinois is predominantly based on real estate taxes, resulting in a large disparity in the amount of money available for public schools among the rich and poor neighborhoods.  Studies show that children from poor and broken families need twice as much funding for their educational support than do the children from families with better resources. Illinois’ system provides the opposite.

We also advocated for the Chicago Public School system to stop expelling minority boys from school at a much higher rate than other children. An investigative report showed that the CPS policy on expelling children related directly to the number of children who ended up in the correctional system–i.e., that’s where the “poverty to prison” pipeline begins, and also where, with some effort, I believe it could be ended.

What fond memories I have of some of the elders of our congregation getting on a bus with people from all over the city to go down to the State Capitol in Springfield and advocate for equality in nursing home care.  How great it felt to participate in a rally outside of the Illinois Capitol building and find out that the legislators really were paying attention.  How inspired I was when we gathered hands in the rotunda of the Capitol Building to sing hymns and pray, and some of the lobbyists and legislators joined with us. How invigorating to converse on topics of importance with state Senators and Representatives, even though sometimes it seemed like we were talking to brick walls.

Too many of our young people today think that church is not relevant.  Seeing churches in action and making a difference in the society may be just what they need to become more involved.  I applaud the Community Renewal Society and the young people who work there.  I especially appreciate the lead organizer, Alex Wiesendanger, for his superb leadership and organizing efforts, and I offer my sincere gratitude for the leadership of Rev. Dr. Calvin Morris, who retired last year as the Executive Director.

If some of you have had similar experiences with faith-based community groups, I’d love to hear about them.

 

 

A Must See

Have you seen the recent film The House I Live In?  If you care at all about poor children of color in this country, you should see it.  It’s by award-winning documentary filmmaker Eugene Jarecki. The film won the Grand Jury Prize for Documentary at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival. Danny Glover is one of the producers, and John Legend has been promoting the film as well.

In the film, Jarecki shares a comprehensive and heart-wrenching look at how the war on drugs has fueled the prison population in America.  The higher sentences for non-violent crimes involving crack cocaine, which is used more frequently in minority and poorer communities, than for powder cocaine, used by the more affluent, has not only increased the prison population, it has torn apart families and neighborhoods, fueled the increase of prisons as a business industry, and flooded the “poverty to prison pipeline.” But it hasn’t made a dent in stemming drug usage.

Some of the information shared in the film:

  • The United States has 5 percent of the world’s population, but 25 percent of the world’s prison population.
  • Today, more people in the United States are incarcerated for nonviolent drug offenses than were incarcerated for all crimes in 1970.
  • One in eight state employees today works for a corrections agency.
  • About 14 percent of drug users in the United States are African American, but 56 percent of those incarcerated for drug crimes are African American.

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Growing up in faith and action

Throughout my life as a lawyer, pastor and author, I’ve always had a heart for the underdog.  I’ve always felt compassion for people who face difficult struggles. I used to think that this was just a part of my personality.  When I was a little girl with five older brothers, I’d share a drink of my pop (yes, I’m from the Chicago area!) with all of them if they didn’t have any….leaving me with little for myself.  But sharing with them made me happy, because they were happy.

I recently was reminded of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs….you know, the one you studied in school that identifies the basic needs of humans in a pyramid, beginning at the base with physiological needs, with the higher needs at the apex.512px-Maslow's_hierarchy_of_needs

According to Maslow, only when you’ve satisfied the basic needs can you focus on achieving the highest of human needs, which is self-actualization.  The pyramid shows that self-actualization includes, at the very top, morality. Every human has a need to fulfill a sense of what’s right and moral in their lives. The human heart that hasn’t been corrupted yearns for goodness and justice, not just for self, but for all.

Self-actualization to me means that you’ve been fortunate enough to have your other basic needs met to such an extent that you can focus on the higher desires of your hearts.  When you reach that point, you’re able to figure out that it’s not all about you.  When you self-actualize, you can stop focusing on your own needs and think more about what purpose you will serve to others in this world.

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