Vanity

I woke up the other day with this song in my head:

If I Can Help Somebody

If I can help somebody, as I pass along,

If I can cheer somebody, with a word or song,

If I can show somebody, how they’re travelling wrong,

Then my living shall not be in vain.

Chorus:

My living shall not be in vain,

Then my living shall not be in vain

If I can help somebody, as I pass along,

Then my living shall not be in vain.

 

If I can do my duty, as a good man ought,

If I can bring back beauty, to a world up wrought,

If I can spread love’s message, as the Master taught,

Then my living shall not be in vain.

 

mahalia_jackson

This highly favored hymn/gospel song was written by little-known composer Alma Bazel Androzzo in 1945, later made famous by Mahalia Jackson, Tennessee Ernie, BillieEckstein and others. You can find all kinds of versions of it on the web (click here.)

I don’t know how that song got into my head.  I hadn’t heard it in a very long time.  But it is full of meaning, isn’t it?  It reminded me of how I ended up in the ministry.  I had a healthy career, working on a job that I liked, was making good money and had gained considerable expertise in my field.  My second son was graduating from college.  A comfortable life as a tax attorney, with the freedom to do pretty much what I wanted and when I wanted, was just over the horizon.

About that time my call to ministry became undeniable. The thought had been nagging at me for years.  I had a hunger that could not be satisfied with money, comfort or freedom. The thought that finally brought me over was “Life is too short.”

Life is too short not to dedicate it to something meaningful.  Life is too short to spend it chasing after material comfort at the expense of at least trying to make a positive impact in the world.  Life is too short not to give it your best to do what you know you ought to do. Life is too short not to fear living in vain.

The fear of living in vain can easily be pushed aside while we’re striving to make it in this world. Survival is important, but we can become mesmerized beyond surviving to wanting all that we see. Then, when we see the end of life approaching and begin to realize that living in vain might be a real possibility, we find ourselves searching frantically for ways to prove to ourselves and others that we’re here for some purpose beyond self-indulgence.

As the Teacher proclaims about life without meaning in Ecclesiastes 1:2, “All is vanity.”

This one life is all that we have.  Each of us is absolutely unique, which makes our lives all the more precious– and yet we are only temporary, which ought to give us a sense of urgency.  We have this one chance to do something with the precious gift of life that we’ve been given.  Just one chance to get it right, and we don’t know how long that chance will last. Life is too short, however long it may be, and it may be shorter than we hope.

If you believe like I do that our gifts, talents and opportunities are bestowed on us by God to use to make this world a better place, then you will agree with me that life is too short to be distracted by the material things of this world, which can be to us like that fruit on the Tree of Knowledge in the Garden of Eden that seemed too good for Adam and Eve to resist.

This wonderful song helps to remind me that when we reach the end of our journeys, more than anything else, people will remember how well we did or did not love them. It helps to remind me of what’s really important–loving God enough to try to obey God, loving each other enough to do for others what we’d want someone to do for us.

If I can just stay focused on that, then my living shall not be in vain, no, my living shall not be in vain.

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