Disturb Us, O Lord

Someone posted on Facebook this reading of the Prayer of Sir Francis Drake:

Boat-In-A-Storm

Disturb us, Lord, when
We are too pleased with ourselves,
When our dreams have come true
Because we dreamed too little,
When we arrived safely
Because we sailed too close to the shore.

Disturb us, Lord, when
with the abundance of things we possess
We have lost our thirst
For the waters of life;
Having fallen in love with life,
We have ceased to dream of eternity
And in our efforts to build a new earth,
We have allowed our vision
Of the new Heaven to dim.

Disturb us, Lord, to dare more boldly,
To venture on wilder seas
Where storms will show Your mastery;
Where losing sight of land,
We shall find the stars.

We ask you to push back
The horizons of our hopes;
And to push back the future
In strength, courage, hope, and love.

This we ask in the name of our Captain,
Who is Jesus Christ.

Beautiful, isn’t it?  Thought provoking.  This wonderful prayer has been reposted and used over and over by many.  You can find it all over the web.  I decided to make it a topic of this week’s blog, but when I did some research on Sir Francis Blake, I changed my mind.  You see, he was a great explorer, but he was also a slaver and a pirate, forcibly making slaves of West Africans (I can’t help but wonder if he used that castle in Ghana that I visited) and raiding Spanish ships to steal their wealth.  He was lauded for this, and knighted. Blake even “excommunicated” his ship’s chaplain for suggesting that Blake was wrong for beheading his co-commander Thomas Doughty. I couldn’t help but wonder if the preacher was the one who gave Blake this wonderful prayer!

When I found out all of this, I thought I wouldn’t post the prayer.  I couldn’t help but think that Blake was using this prayer to lead him to further “adventures” of enslaving people and stealing their lands, claiming them in the name of England. I did not want to join you or me in those kind of thoughts.

Then a Facebook posting by my friend Carolyn Lester changed my mind:

“It is not a matter of our fitness or unfitness; what we declare when we witness is the Word of another who never fails. That Word has as much authority on our weakest days as on our strongest; it is not a question of our own worthiness.” Vance Havner

This word by a Southern Baptist preacher struck me as so true that I decided to post both it and Blake’s beautiful prayer.  Because it is the prayer that is inspirational, even if Blake is not.  God can use broken vessels to accomplish beautiful purposes– like John Newton, who wrote the most loved of all Christian hymns, Amazing Grace.  He was also involved in enslaving Africans before, and for a while after, his spiritual conversion.

God’s word is pure.  It is true.  You will feel the truth of God when it’s spoken no matter how faulty the speaker may be, though it is sometimes difficult to look past the vessel of delivery.

I encourage you to look beyond the horrible wrongs that Blake did to see the beauty of this prayer for what it is, a prayer that reminds us that if we allow God to lead us, we may be blessed in ways so beyond our own vision and limitations that we could not have imagined how to ask for them. This prayer helps us to recognize that sometimes we need to be disturbed out of our comfort zones, to be shaken out of our usual patterns, to have our own boundaries challenged, and to open our spiritual eyes to the material world around us in order for us to see and be what God wants us to see and be. Allow the beautiful words of Francis Blake to bless your hearts, to broaden your horizons, to open you to the amazing breadth and depth of God’s boundless love for all of humanity and to give you the ability to dream larger and the strength to push on.

God’s truth will march on!  Maybe sometimes even through me…

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